The cake in this instructable is a two tier fruit cake, decorated with gorgeous bright red poppies. This is a design specific to my friends' desires, but I have attempted to expand the instructable to cover making wedding cakes in general, from the ambitious planning stages to the nervewracking final set up. This may have led me to ramble a little more than I should, but buried amongst that are the little tips &  tricks I've picked up a long the way.
Not only do Marks & Spencer give you the opportunity to create your own cake masterpiece but did you know you can also now purchase your wedding flowers too? From bouquets to buttonholes they have got it all covered. There is great offer on where you can save £50 on Wedding Flowers when you spend £150 or more on Wedding Cakes online. Use code FLOWERS50 at checkout.
Another way to save money on your cake is to skip an outer layer of frosting. Naked cakes are not only gorgeous to look at, they're actually pretty practical too. They're a lot less expensive because they use less buttercream and take less time—it's as simple as that. To make up for the lack of frosting on the outside, up the wow factor on the inside by experimenting with unique flavors and fillings, like lemon curd, champagne buttercream or chocolate ganache with toasted almonds.
I usually fill and frost the cake the day before the wedding, so there's plenty of time to fix mistakes. Using a serrated bread knife or cake leveler, trim your first frozen cake layer so it is as level as possible. Place the cake on a cake board with about a half-inch clearance on all sides (you can always trim the cake board down if you don't use that much frosting). Pipe a circle of frosting around the circumference of the cake, and then neatly pipe in your filling. Place the next layer on top, and repeat until all the layers in this tier are stacked. Then use your icing spatula to apply a thin "crumb coat" of frosting all over the cake. Put this tier in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to set. After 30 minutes, you can apply your top layer of buttercream or smooth fondant over the cake if you're using it. Repeat with all your tiers.
In the 17th century, two cakes were made, one for the bride and one for the groom. The groom's cake would die out and the bride's cake become the main cake for the event. When the two cakes were served together, the groom's cake was typically the darker colored, rich fruit cake and generally much smaller than the bride's cake. The bride's cake was usually a simple pound cake with white icing because white was a sign of virginity and purity.[3]
Thanks to Pinterest, there are about a billion wedding cake photos to choose from!  Typically, a buttercream cake will cost less than a fondant cake.  However, not all designs can be achieved with buttercream, so keep that in mind when looking at cake photos.  Our buttercream cakes start at $6 per serving and our fondant cakes start at $7 per serving.  So here is the easy part – if you want a tiered cake with 100 servings, multiply $6 X 100 and voila, your cake will start at $600 for buttercream.  Does that mean that all buttercream cakes are $6 per serving?  The simple answer is no.  Just like not all fondant cakes will remain at $7 per serving, however, it’s a good place to start.
Before you head to the grocery store, do your best to calculate how much of each ingredient you need. When scaling up a recipe, be sure to scale by area, not diameter of the pans. Make a list, and then buy one extra container of everything. You can always return unopened groceries, and you'll be so glad if you don't have to run out for more ingredients at the last minute.

Fab post with loads of ideas. I’m. Hoping to make my own New York themed wedding cake using an m&s cake. Plan to use icing to cut out the new York skyline and wrap it around a layer of the cake. Also going to make fondant yellow cabs and the post has just given me the idea to make peg versions of my partner and I – I might try to create a central park scene at the top as that is where we got engaged x
Once the marzipan is draped over the cake, gently pull down the sides to cover any gaps. Smooth the flat of your hand down the sides, pressing the marzipan to the cake and amoothing out any creases or overlaps, Rub the flat of your hand or a cake smoother over the top firmly to flatten and smooth the surface. Smooth out the sides in the same way. Trim off any excess marzipan around the bottom of the cake with a sharp knife and peel it off the board. This can be kept in an airtight bag or container for use next time.
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