Our wedding is a diy affair. The cake is going to be my fellas job. He’s an engineer, so wants to build a crane that will be lifting the top teir inti place/hovering it above the rest of the cake. It’s a chance for him to put his personality onto something. He also wants to use his new laser cutter to design and make a bespoke topper. Winning the cake would be amazing snd give him the time and confidence to concentrate on these decorative features. Xx
Limit decoration to the cake being iced and decorate it instead with a simple ribbon. This will save on either a cake topper or fresh blooms but still look chic on the big day. Choose a ribbon that matches your colour scheme and finish with a vintage brooch. Alternatively, we love this idea of using a stencil and dusting Mr and Mrs onto the top of your cake with icing sugar – a real talking point, and it will look great in your photos!

Take a 30 gauge wire, dip it in edible glue, and carefully insert this into the raised ridge. Gently pinch the edges of the petal to give them a little realistic frill. If you have a petal veiner, lay the petal in the venier and press down firmly. This will give the petal veins and contours to make it more realistic, This can also be acheived with some patience and a thin modellling tool.
This code deducts £50 off your Wedding Flowers order when you spend £150 or more on Wedding Cakes. Valid at marksandspencer.com only from 12/05/15 until 23:59 30/06/15. Discount will be applied at the checkout. Offer excludes Wedding Favours, Decorations, Wedding Arrangements and Wedding Plants. Decorations are not included as the price applies only to the plain cake. This code can only be used once. Offer strictly non-transferable and cannot be sold or exchanged for cash. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other voucher or code. Any refunds will be taken into account this discount. M&S reserves the right to reject this voucher code with reasonable cause.
You’ll need a cake that is appropriate with the look of your venue, the season, your marriage ceremony robe, the flower arrangements and the menu. Arrive at your cake session prepared—you need not have a whole sketch in hand, however data of basic phrases will make it easier on everybody. And if you happen to’re searching for a customized design, bring alongside inspiration, like a swatch of lace from your gown or a picture of your marriage ceremony china.
A wedding cake is the traditional cake served at wedding receptions following dinner. In some parts of England, the wedding cake is served at a wedding breakfast; the 'wedding breakfast' does not mean the meal will be held in the morning, but at a time following the ceremony on the same day. In modern Western culture, the cake is usually on display and served to guests at the reception. Traditionally, wedding cakes were made to bring good luck to all guests and the couple. Modernly however, they are more of a centerpiece to the wedding and are not always even served to the guests. Some cakes are built with only a single edible tier for the bride and groom to share, but this is rare since the cost difference between fake and real tiers is minimal.
For me, the cake is the easy part. But I don't have the patience or skill to make thousands of fondant flowers or smooth buttercream perfectly. That's why I always choose foolproof, classic decorations like satin ribbon (be sure to cover the back with clear plastic tape so the fabric doesn't become greasy, and secure with a pearl-headed pin) and fresh flowers. Covering frosting with shredded coconut or white chocolate curls is another easy way to hide imperfections. I've also seen a gorgeous wedding cake covered in rainbow sprinkles. This frosting that looks like a cloud is simple but looks dreamy. Another rustic style I really like that favors the lazy froster is having a "naked" cake, with filling and frosting on the top, but little to no frosting on the sides. Choose decoration you feel comfortable doing and remember that simple is usually better.
While the seedheads are drying you can start work on the stamens. These tend to come in bunches of around 100. Divide these into smaller groups of about ten. Take one group, make sure the heads are roughly level, and brush the middle and up to a centimetre from each end with edible glues Squeeze the stamen threads together to bind them, and let dry. Do this with each small group.
For me, the cake is the easy part. But I don't have the patience or skill to make thousands of fondant flowers or smooth buttercream perfectly. That's why I always choose foolproof, classic decorations like satin ribbon (be sure to cover the back with clear plastic tape so the fabric doesn't become greasy, and secure with a pearl-headed pin) and fresh flowers. Covering frosting with shredded coconut or white chocolate curls is another easy way to hide imperfections. I've also seen a gorgeous wedding cake covered in rainbow sprinkles. This frosting that looks like a cloud is simple but looks dreamy. Another rustic style I really like that favors the lazy froster is having a "naked" cake, with filling and frosting on the top, but little to no frosting on the sides. Choose decoration you feel comfortable doing and remember that simple is usually better.
Lastly, don’t forget that there will be a delivery charge to deliver your cake to the venue.  How much that fee will be, depends on the location of your venue from our bakery.  The further we have to travel, the higher your delivery cost will be.  In some cases, it’s not only the distance we have to travel, but the time it will take to make the delivery – traffic, difficult roads, lack of parking, etc.  I would say our average delivery fee is about $50-65, with locations such as Santa Barbara and Los Angeles being $100-150+.  When you consider how stressful a wedding cake delivery can be, getting the cake to the venue on time, battling the heat, the weight of the cake, and the fact that they are flat out awkward to handle, you should always opt for delivery…let the professionals do what they do!
The white color has been attached to wedding ceremonies since the Victorian era when Queen Victoria chose to wear a white lace wedding dress at her wedding to Prince Albert in 1840. Queen Victoria accentuated an existing symbol, the color white being frequently associated with virginity and purity in Western culture. The wedding cake was originally known as the bride's cake therefore the color white became common because the cake needed to reflect the bride – and the expensive ingredients that the family was able to afford, such as refined white sugar.[10][unreliable source?]
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