Now you can attach the stamens. At this point edible glue will probably not be strong enough, so use some high tack non toxic glue such as PVA. For each seedhead you will need four or five small stamen bunches arranged evenly around the head. Glue the stamens to the base of the seed head, squeezing the end tight to the base and the wire to make them stick.
Cupcake wedding cake – You typically order cupcakes by the dozen. If you have 100 people at your wedding, you will need 9 dozen for those who will eat more than 1 cupcake. Let’s use $25 per dozen of wedding cupcakes. So, for 9 dozen would be a total cost of $225. This is double the cost of your sheet cake at Costco but still less than the picture perfect classic wedding cakes. In addiction, think about all the different flavors of cake, frosting and fillings you can have with 108 cupcakes.
Wedding cake toppers are models or art pieces that sit atop the cake. In the US, the most common type of cake topper features a representation of a bride and groom in wedding attire. This custom was dominant in US weddings in the 1950s, where it represented togetherness.[27] Wedding toppers may also be figures that indicate shared hobbies or other passions, if they are used at all.[27] Some are humorous, or may represent the couple's hobby or occupation. In Mexico, the wedding topper and other decorations tell a story about the couple's history.[16]

Take a 30 gauge wire, dip it in edible glue, and carefully insert this into the raised ridge. Gently pinch the edges of the petal to give them a little realistic frill. If you have a petal veiner, lay the petal in the venier and press down firmly. This will give the petal veins and contours to make it more realistic, This can also be acheived with some patience and a thin modellling tool.
I usually fill and frost the cake the day before the wedding, so there's plenty of time to fix mistakes. Using a serrated bread knife or cake leveler, trim your first frozen cake layer so it is as level as possible. Place the cake on a cake board with about a half-inch clearance on all sides (you can always trim the cake board down if you don't use that much frosting). Pipe a circle of frosting around the circumference of the cake, and then neatly pipe in your filling. Place the next layer on top, and repeat until all the layers in this tier are stacked. Then use your icing spatula to apply a thin "crumb coat" of frosting all over the cake. Put this tier in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to set. After 30 minutes, you can apply your top layer of buttercream or smooth fondant over the cake if you're using it. Repeat with all your tiers.
What about a sheet cake?  We do offer sheet cakes, and they are a great way to supplement cake servings, without paying for a huge tiered cake with 250 servings.  What I mean by that is, if your guest count is 250, order a smaller tiered cake (the most common size cake we bake is a 3 tier with 80 servings & shown in the photo above) and then supplement the rest of your cake servings with sheet cake.  Sheet cakes are basic frosted cakes, delivered to the kitchen, cut by catering staff, and never seen by guests, therefore they cost less per serving then a tiered cake.  Keep in mind, that we will only make sheet cakes for wedding clients ordering a two tier or larger cake from us.
Use an online calculator to determine what size cake to make. This can be a little tricky, as it's dependent on both what shape cake pans you choose, as well as how many people will be at the wedding. Know that wedding cake servings are usually smaller than regular cake servings. Start by asking how many people the couple is expecting at the reception and whether there will there be other desserts or just cake. You definitely don't want to run out of cake, but you also don't want to go to the trouble of making a five-tier cake only to have four tiers leftover at the end of the night. For a very large reception (200+), consider making a smaller wedding cake and then baking sheet cakes to make up the rest of the cake you need. Also, ask the bride and groom if they plan to keep the top tier as a memento. Some couples may want to follow the tradition of freezing that cake and eating it on their first anniversary.
Matthew is the founder of My Wedding Songs. He curates hundreds of song lists and has been published in Mobile Beat Magazine. Matthew is a charter member of the Las Vegas Wedding Chamber of Commerce and Las Vegas Bloggers Meetup organizer. His work has been referenced in Rock n Roll Bride, Ruffled, WeddingLoveley, Wedding Chicks, Offbeat Bride, Emmaline Bride, and 100 Layer Cake. Read more about his inspiring story.
The bride's cake would transform into the modern wedding cake we know today.[3] In the early 19th century, sugar became easier to obtain during the time when the bride's cakes became popular. The more refined and whiter sugars were still very expensive. so only wealthy families could afford to have a very pure white frosting. This display would show the wealth and social status of the family.[12] When Queen Victoria used white icing on her cake it gained a new title, royal icing.[13]
When making any flower you start with the centre and leave it to dry hard to provide a stable base for the creation. For the poppies the centre is the seed head. This is made using some pale green flower paste. Either buy the paste coloured or colour it yourself by adding a small amount of green food colouring paste and kneading it through to an even shade. Take a 24 gauge wire and use some pliers to bend a small hook onto the end.
While I'd love to go into  the many options of cake decorating, right now I don't have the time, so just a brief mention of royal icing. This is made using icing sugar and egg whites, or from a pre bought mix, and is a pipeable icing that dries very hard. It can be coloured before piping, or painted after, and is great for adding detail such as beads and borders to cake. While I used none on the poppy cake, a sprinkling of piped pearls or a bead border around the top edge can be great for covering up flaws and cracks in the icing, while enhancing the overall look of the cake.
When making your own or someone elses wedding cake, timing is key. You will need to work out how much time you realistically have in the week leading up to the wedding and plan things accordingly. Decorations such as flowers, toppers and some royal icing shapes can be made quite a while beforehand to remove the stress in the immediate lead up to the big day.
In the world of frosting, there are two big hitters: buttercream and fondant, and there are pros and cons to each—including cost. Buttercream is typically less expensive. Fondant, on the other hand, requires extra steps and materials, and can be difficult to work with, making it more expensive. But do your due diligence regardless and don't assume your cake will be less expensive with buttercream: You might want a smooth, seemingly simple appliqué finish on a buttercream cake, when in reality, this pristine style requires precision and time. Long story short, you may not save as much as you'd hoped. And some bakers may charge you extra for fondant, especially if you're requesting a lace appliqué or a detailed pattern design, so it's good to ask your baker these questions up front.
At this point, you have done everything you can until the cake is on the cake stand at the wedding site. Put the tiers in cake boxes in the fridge until you're ready to go. Once you've transported the cakes to the wedding site while inevitably freaking out over every bump in the road, keep the cake out of the heat in a cool spot for as long as possible. Set up your cake stand on a moving table or at its final destination in the reception hall. Finally, gently stack the tiers — it can help to have some extra help for this sometimes nerve-wracking step. If you assemble your tiers and think, "Hmm, that looks lopsided," then frosting is your friend! Don't be afraid to remove a tier, add more frosting to level out the top of the tier below, and then put the cake back together.
For a bride on a budget, paying a large sum of money for a wedding cake may seem completely outrageous. But what are the alternatives, particularly when you don't have any baking experts in your family? Turns out, making a wedding cake is not as difficult as one might think. There is some significant planning and effort that will need to happen, so make sure you carefully weigh the expense of a cake versus your time (and expectations) as you make your final decisions. And if the cake isn't your thing, you can always serve pie, ice cream, or even an ice cream sundae bar at your wedding.
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