When it comes to where the cake ought to be placed in the function area, summertime wedding events and cakes have to be very carefully assumed about. Shut out of the direct sunshine, warm and also wedding cakes not a match made in paradise. Maintain covered in case of flies. Never under no conditions position your wedding celebration cake near the dance flooring since the boogie bopper might create a lotta heartache. A consistent table is a have to for the cutting of the cake.

In Medieval England cakes were stacked as high as possible for the bride and groom to kiss over. A successful kiss meant they were guaranteed a prosperous life together.[3] From this the Croquembouche was created. The myth behind this cake tells of a Pastry chef, visiting Medieval England who witnessed their tradition of piling sweet rolls between the bride and groom, which they attempted to kiss over without knocking them all down. The pastry chef then went back to France and piled sweet rolls up into a tower to make the first Croquembouche. The modern croquembouche is still very popular in France, where it is now common to place the croquembouche tower on a bed of cake and make it a top tier. This traditional French wedding cake is built from Profiteroles and given a halo of spun sugar.[7]
In some areas, particularly the American South, two cakes are presented at weddings. Usually, a large, white tiered cake, decorated mostly in white frosting, is called the bride's cake, and a second flavor choice is called the "groom's cake". This tradition was brought over from England by early American colonists,[citation needed] who considered the white-iced bride's cake too light for men's tastes. The groom's cake was usually a dark, liquor-soaked fruitcake. More recently, groom's cakes are usually chocolate or another of his favorite flavors. The groom's cake may be decorated or shaped as something significant to him, such as a hobby item, sports team or symbol of his occupation. The movie Steel Magnolias included a red velvet groom's cake in the shape of a giant armadillo.
Verify the details of the cake as well as its cost.
Of course, there's no prescribed or exact timeline because everyone's engagements are different lengths—and you can successfully plan a wedding in as little as a few months if that's what you want to do. But we're here to give you a little snapshot of all your wedding to-dos to steer you in the right direction (especially if your engagement length fits the bill as "average," which is a little over a year). 
The tiers should reflect the number of guests you would like to feed, as well as personal preference. This is another of the often overlooked hidden costs attached to a bigger guest list. Expect to pay more not just for your venue hire and wedding breakfast themselves, but also for larger cakes, more table centres and additional bottles of wine too.

Planning your time can affect everything about your cake, right down to the flavour. Filled sponge cakes are best baked as close to the day as possible, and baking enough for a couple of tiers can take a lot of hours in mixing, baking and cooling. Opting for a traditional fruit cake, on the other hand, allows you to make the cake in advance. In fact this is preferable since an important step in making fruit cake is feeding it with a regular spoonful of brandy or sherry every few days for at least a couple of weeks, to make it gorgeously moist and alcoholic.
In Medieval England cakes were stacked as high as possible for the bride and groom to kiss over. A successful kiss meant they were guaranteed a prosperous life together.[3] From this the Croquembouche was created. The myth behind this cake tells of a Pastry chef, visiting Medieval England who witnessed their tradition of piling sweet rolls between the bride and groom, which they attempted to kiss over without knocking them all down. The pastry chef then went back to France and piled sweet rolls up into a tower to make the first Croquembouche. The modern croquembouche is still very popular in France, where it is now common to place the croquembouche tower on a bed of cake and make it a top tier. This traditional French wedding cake is built from Profiteroles and given a halo of spun sugar.[7]
Tone down what costs the most – In the wedding cake industry, think about what costs the most money. First and foremost it time. Do not have any extra flowers or decorative features on the cake. Keep it simple but just having a colored ribbon around the cake. Next, do not have any fillings and fillings are extra time and cost for the filling. Last, only plan a cake size for the exact number of planned attending guests and one piece for each.
Cupcake wedding cake – You typically order cupcakes by the dozen. If you have 100 people at your wedding, you will need 9 dozen for those who will eat more than 1 cupcake. Let’s use $25 per dozen of wedding cupcakes. So, for 9 dozen would be a total cost of $225. This is double the cost of your sheet cake at Costco but still less than the picture perfect classic wedding cakes. In addiction, think about all the different flavors of cake, frosting and fillings you can have with 108 cupcakes.
For me, the cake is the easy part. But I don't have the patience or skill to make thousands of fondant flowers or smooth buttercream perfectly. That's why I always choose foolproof, classic decorations like satin ribbon (be sure to cover the back with clear plastic tape so the fabric doesn't become greasy, and secure with a pearl-headed pin) and fresh flowers. Covering frosting with shredded coconut or white chocolate curls is another easy way to hide imperfections. I've also seen a gorgeous wedding cake covered in rainbow sprinkles. This frosting that looks like a cloud is simple but looks dreamy. Another rustic style I really like that favors the lazy froster is having a "naked" cake, with filling and frosting on the top, but little to no frosting on the sides. Choose decoration you feel comfortable doing and remember that simple is usually better.
Use an online calculator to determine what size cake to make. This can be a little tricky, as it's dependent on both what shape cake pans you choose, as well as how many people will be at the wedding. Know that wedding cake servings are usually smaller than regular cake servings. Start by asking how many people the couple is expecting at the reception and whether there will there be other desserts or just cake. You definitely don't want to run out of cake, but you also don't want to go to the trouble of making a five-tier cake only to have four tiers leftover at the end of the night. For a very large reception (200+), consider making a smaller wedding cake and then baking sheet cakes to make up the rest of the cake you need. Also, ask the bride and groom if they plan to keep the top tier as a memento. Some couples may want to follow the tradition of freezing that cake and eating it on their first anniversary.
Fruitcake may be traditional, but it’s by no means everyone’s favourite. When you’ve chosen your cake maker, ask for a tasting consultation so that you can try the different flavours on offer. Choose one to use throughout or go for something different on every tier, the choice is entirely yours. We would recommend thinking of your guests at least a little since your wedding cake will almost always be shared.

I usually fill and frost the cake the day before the wedding, so there's plenty of time to fix mistakes. Using a serrated bread knife or cake leveler, trim your first frozen cake layer so it is as level as possible. Place the cake on a cake board with about a half-inch clearance on all sides (you can always trim the cake board down if you don't use that much frosting). Pipe a circle of frosting around the circumference of the cake, and then neatly pipe in your filling. Place the next layer on top, and repeat until all the layers in this tier are stacked. Then use your icing spatula to apply a thin "crumb coat" of frosting all over the cake. Put this tier in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to set. After 30 minutes, you can apply your top layer of buttercream or smooth fondant over the cake if you're using it. Repeat with all your tiers.
Matthew is the founder of My Wedding Songs. He curates hundreds of song lists and has been published in Mobile Beat Magazine. Matthew is a charter member of the Las Vegas Wedding Chamber of Commerce and Las Vegas Bloggers Meetup organizer. His work has been referenced in Rock n Roll Bride, Ruffled, WeddingLoveley, Wedding Chicks, Offbeat Bride, Emmaline Bride, and 100 Layer Cake. Read more about his inspiring story.
In Europe in the 19th century, the cakes baked to serve at the christening of an infant were similar to wedding cakes. Eventually, since the wedding cakes were generally made of fruitcake, which would store well, and because the first baby often arrived within a year or so of the wedding, it became traditional to save the top part of the wedding cake to eat in celebration of the couple's first child.[30] More recently, some people freeze part of the cake and save it until the couple's first wedding anniversary.[30]
Usually, wedding event cakes are is the standard cake being dished up to the guests at the morning meal after the wedding celebration. It is defined as a big cake, different from the common cakes we have on average celebrations.
My boyfriend and I are actually thinking of customising an M&S cake for our wedding cake – the plan is to make fondant icing safari animals to place around the sides and then we have Ryu and Chun-Li figurines (from the Street Fighter computer game) to put on top to hopefully make it look a bit like a stage of the computer game. It’s not really part of a theme as such, just something that we both happen to love!
Sadly, your cake isn't going to be preserved in a wedding cake museum for all time — or maybe not so sadly since that would be such a big waste of butter — so be sure to take lots and lots of photos. Most wedding photographers will take lots of shots of the cake, too, and you can ask the bride or groom for those later. And make sure to get one of yourself with the cake!
Verify the details of the cake as well as its cost.
Use an online calculator to determine what size cake to make. This can be a little tricky, as it's dependent on both what shape cake pans you choose, as well as how many people will be at the wedding. Know that wedding cake servings are usually smaller than regular cake servings. Start by asking how many people the couple is expecting at the reception and whether there will there be other desserts or just cake. You definitely don't want to run out of cake, but you also don't want to go to the trouble of making a five-tier cake only to have four tiers leftover at the end of the night. For a very large reception (200+), consider making a smaller wedding cake and then baking sheet cakes to make up the rest of the cake you need. Also, ask the bride and groom if they plan to keep the top tier as a memento. Some couples may want to follow the tradition of freezing that cake and eating it on their first anniversary.
Planning your time can affect everything about your cake, right down to the flavour. Filled sponge cakes are best baked as close to the day as possible, and baking enough for a couple of tiers can take a lot of hours in mixing, baking and cooling. Opting for a traditional fruit cake, on the other hand, allows you to make the cake in advance. In fact this is preferable since an important step in making fruit cake is feeding it with a regular spoonful of brandy or sherry every few days for at least a couple of weeks, to make it gorgeously moist and alcoholic.
For a bride on a budget, paying a large sum of money for a wedding cake may seem completely outrageous. But what are the alternatives, particularly when you don't have any baking experts in your family? Turns out, making a wedding cake is not as difficult as one might think. There is some significant planning and effort that will need to happen, so make sure you carefully weigh the expense of a cake versus your time (and expectations) as you make your final decisions. And if the cake isn't your thing, you can always serve pie, ice cream, or even an ice cream sundae bar at your wedding.
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