When making your own or someone elses wedding cake, timing is key. You will need to work out how much time you realistically have in the week leading up to the wedding and plan things accordingly. Decorations such as flowers, toppers and some royal icing shapes can be made quite a while beforehand to remove the stress in the immediate lead up to the big day.
My fiance and I love the idea of a day-of-the-dead themed cake. We love all things fiesta related but would tone it down as our theme is more romantic/vintage we thought we could paintly bright flowers, make sugar flowers and have some colourful pansies to cascade down the cake. Top this with bright peonies, colourful ribbons wrapping each layer and lots of pom-poms for a riot of colour!
There are many lovely and unique ways to high your cake. You probably have an heirloom piece—particularly a superb porcelain vintage—work together with your baker to combine it into the cake’s design. It will probably double as your “something outdated.” Different alternate options embrace a bouquet of sugar flowers, a cascade of icing ribbons or even a sugar block carved to reveal your new monogram. Look to your locale as properly. A cluster of coral can look gorgeous for a beachside celebration, or attempt a fondant snowflake for a winter wedding. Or don’t use one in any respect—some designs look great with out a topper.
Depending on what kind of filling you're using, it can usually be made well in advance. But some frostings need to be made closer to when the cake will be served. Between the recipe and your practice cakes, you should have a sense of how early the filling and frosting can be made and how long they'll hold up. Once again, overestimate how much you need. Plan to bring an extra pastry bag of frosting to the wedding site to patch up any little cracks that happen while transporting the cake.
Another way to save money on your cake is to skip an outer layer of frosting. Naked cakes are not only gorgeous to look at, they're actually pretty practical too. They're a lot less expensive because they use less buttercream and take less time—it's as simple as that. To make up for the lack of frosting on the outside, up the wow factor on the inside by experimenting with unique flavors and fillings, like lemon curd, champagne buttercream or chocolate ganache with toasted almonds.

Wedding cake was originally a luxury item, and a sign of celebration and social status. The bigger the cake, the higher the social standing. Wedding cakes in England and early America were traditionally fruit cakes, often topped with marzipan and icing with tiers, Cutting the cake was an important part of the reception. White icing was also a symbol of money and social importance in Victorian times, so a white cake was highly desired.[5] Today, many flavors and configurations are available in addition to the traditional all-white tiered cake.[6]
Sugar flowers will always cost more than fresh flowers.  Why?  Because they are very time consuming to make, and require a skilled hand, with knowledge on how to construct, wire, etc. a beautiful looking flower made from sugar!  Sugar flowers can start at about $15 per flower – the more complex the flower design, the higher the price.  As much a I love, love, love sugar flowers on a cake, most couples do not have the budget to spend $200-300 on just sugar flowers alone, I get it!  So, unless you do, opt for fresh flowers instead.
Sheet Wedding Cakes – A full-size sheet cake typically feeds about 108 people. The cost at your local grocery store or warehouse discount store of a full-size sheet cake will be about $50. A 100 tiered cake would be a combined 3-tier cake. Going by the formula above, you professional wedding cake would be a minimum of $150 for 100 people. But let’s be real. Depending on what you want most professional wedding cake bakers will charge more than $1.50 per slice just for the sheer time to bake and frost a 3-tier cake.
×