The bride's cake would transform into the modern wedding cake we know today.[3] In the early 19th century, sugar became easier to obtain during the time when the bride's cakes became popular. The more refined and whiter sugars were still very expensive. so only wealthy families could afford to have a very pure white frosting. This display would show the wealth and social status of the family.[12] When Queen Victoria used white icing on her cake it gained a new title, royal icing.[13]
Another thing to note about cakes, the more detailed the cake design, the higher the price will be.  And, just because a cake looks like a “simple” design, doesn’t mean that it is.  I know there are  many amazing cakes online, and in magazines and with cake artists pushing cake design to new limits, it’s easy to fall in love with so many of the beautiful cakes we all see.  Things like hand painting, edible gold, sugar flowers, tons of little sugar pearls on the cake, all translate into beautiful designs, but also a higher cake cost.  Some of these cakes can run as much as $15 per serving…gasp!  But think about it, you go out to dinner at a chain restaurant and pay $15 for a so so meal, that was probably frozen and took about 20 minutes to make.   A cake artist can spend HOURS from start to finish on your wedding cake, and we think our time is worth it.  Cake decorating is an art and not just anyone can do it.  Not to mention ingredient costs, like fresh fruit, butter and eggs!  That stuff is expensive!
In Europe in the 19th century, the cakes baked to serve at the christening of an infant were similar to wedding cakes. Eventually, since the wedding cakes were generally made of fruitcake, which would store well, and because the first baby often arrived within a year or so of the wedding, it became traditional to save the top part of the wedding cake to eat in celebration of the couple's first child.[30] More recently, some people freeze part of the cake and save it until the couple's first wedding anniversary.[30]
The bride's cake would transform into the modern wedding cake we know today.[3] In the early 19th century, sugar became easier to obtain during the time when the bride's cakes became popular. The more refined and whiter sugars were still very expensive. so only wealthy families could afford to have a very pure white frosting. This display would show the wealth and social status of the family.[12] When Queen Victoria used white icing on her cake it gained a new title, royal icing.[13]
Different types of cakes have been popular in different countries and at different times. In some countries, such as Italy, different couples choose different types of cake, according to their preferences.[16] In others, a single type is chosen by most people. Even when a type is preferred within a culture, the preferred type may change significantly over time. For example, the traditional wedding cake in Korea was a rice cake topped with a powder made from red beans, but now guests are likely to see a sponge cake and fresh fruit.[16]
In the world of frosting, there are two big hitters: buttercream and fondant, and there are pros and cons to each—including cost. Buttercream is typically less expensive. Fondant, on the other hand, requires extra steps and materials, and can be difficult to work with, making it more expensive. But do your due diligence regardless and don't assume your cake will be less expensive with buttercream: You might want a smooth, seemingly simple appliqué finish on a buttercream cake, when in reality, this pristine style requires precision and time. Long story short, you may not save as much as you'd hoped. And some bakers may charge you extra for fondant, especially if you're requesting a lace appliqué or a detailed pattern design, so it's good to ask your baker these questions up front.
Not only are blossoms worn or hand held by the bride-to-be at the wedding they are additionally popular for decorating wedding celebration cakes. Fresh blossoms are lovely and also can be highly scented so choose carefully make sure minus cost-free from chemicals.

Schedule of cake designers may be limited at the bakeshop of your selection so make certain to check this out prior to wrapping up any decisions on exactly how you want your cake to look. A very early chat with the cake baker to talk over the layout and flavour is a wise step and also should be done a minimum of 6 months prior to the set date therefore offering him/her plenty of time to develop the perfect wedding celebration cake. You may need to pay a down payment fee for appointment.

Verify the details of the cake as well as its cost.
Flower paste or gumpaste is a pliable dough usually made from egg whites, unflavored gelatine, and powdered sugar. There are an array of methods and ingredients around the world on how to make flower paste or gumpaste. The purpose of this dough is to create flowers and decorations for a cake. Due to the use of gum as one of the ingredients; it can be rolled very thin.[citation needed]

Tone down what costs the most – In the wedding cake industry, think about what costs the most money. First and foremost it time. Do not have any extra flowers or decorative features on the cake. Keep it simple but just having a colored ribbon around the cake. Next, do not have any fillings and fillings are extra time and cost for the filling. Last, only plan a cake size for the exact number of planned attending guests and one piece for each.


Brilliant, some really fantastic ideas. We have been thinking about getting the cheese tiered cake from M&S and decorating it ourselves but I now really love the idea of getting these cakes and decorating it. We’ve got two little birds to sit on top of our cake (whatever cake we eventually choose) that are actually ring holders! They’d look lovely on top of this M&S cake with some flowers and lace. Thank you, I feel inspired!
Once cooked, leave the cake to cool in the tin. When cool, remove from the tin and place on some baking parchment. Drizzle a couple of tablespoons of brandy (or your other chosen liquor) over the cake and wrap it up tightly in parchment and clingfilm or foil. Every few days unwrap the cake to feed it with another spoonful of liquor, then wrap it back up and return to a safe, temperate storage space.

Once you have your smooth surface you can take care of any flaws that are left. Marks and cracks in the icing can be hidden by taking a small ball of icing, dipping it in some cornflour or icing sugar, and rubbing it over the problem area. The icing sugar will fill the crack and blend it into the surface, smoothing it out. Other marks such as cake smears or food colouring can often be removed by brushing on a little clear alcohol, such as vodka, and then rubbing lightly with some kitchen towel. Once the liqour has dried smooth out the surface again.
Once the marzipan is draped over the cake, gently pull down the sides to cover any gaps. Smooth the flat of your hand down the sides, pressing the marzipan to the cake and amoothing out any creases or overlaps, Rub the flat of your hand or a cake smoother over the top firmly to flatten and smooth the surface. Smooth out the sides in the same way. Trim off any excess marzipan around the bottom of the cake with a sharp knife and peel it off the board. This can be kept in an airtight bag or container for use next time.
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