Consider scaling back on cake slices and see if your caterer can also include a round of sweets to supplement (think: passed chocolate-covered strawberries, assorted cookies or mini truffles). Let your caterer know they should cut tasting portions to about three quarters of the usual amount, and plan to plate your cake slices with the other desserts. Ask your caterer to place slices on a buffet or cake table instead of serving a plate at every place setting—or have the staff bring bite-size pieces right to your guests on the dance floor so they can enjoy cake while getting down.
Use an online calculator to determine what size cake to make. This can be a little tricky, as it's dependent on both what shape cake pans you choose, as well as how many people will be at the wedding. Know that wedding cake servings are usually smaller than regular cake servings. Start by asking how many people the couple is expecting at the reception and whether there will there be other desserts or just cake. You definitely don't want to run out of cake, but you also don't want to go to the trouble of making a five-tier cake only to have four tiers leftover at the end of the night. For a very large reception (200+), consider making a smaller wedding cake and then baking sheet cakes to make up the rest of the cake you need. Also, ask the bride and groom if they plan to keep the top tier as a memento. Some couples may want to follow the tradition of freezing that cake and eating it on their first anniversary.

The modern wedding cake as we know it now would originate at the 1882 wedding of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany; his wedding cake was the first to actually be completely edible.[14] Pillars between cake tiers did not begin to appear until about 20 years later. The pillars were very poorly made from broomsticks covered in icing. The tiers represented prosperity and were a status symbol because only wealthy families could afford to include them in the cake.[3] Prince Leopold's wedding cake was created in separate layers with very dense icing. When the icing would harden the tiers could be stacked, a groundbreaking innovation for wedding cakes at the time. Modern wedding cakes still use this method, with an added form of support with dowels imbedded in the cake to help carry the load especially of larger cakes.[citation needed]
Tone down what costs the most – In the wedding cake industry, think about what costs the most money. First and foremost it time. Do not have any extra flowers or decorative features on the cake. Keep it simple but just having a colored ribbon around the cake. Next, do not have any fillings and fillings are extra time and cost for the filling. Last, only plan a cake size for the exact number of planned attending guests and one piece for each.

Traditionally the bride would place a ring inside the couple's portion of the cake to symbolise acceptance of the proposal.[9] Bride's pie would evolve into the bride's cake. At this point the dessert was no longer in the form of a pie and was sweeter than its predecessor.[10] The bride cake was traditionally a plum or fruit cake. In mid-18th century, double icing, which means covering the cake first with almond icing and then with the kind of white icing, was used in bride cake.[11] White-iced upper surface of the bride cake was used as a platform on which all sorts of scenes and emblems could be mounted. The decoration was appeared, they were often at least partially three-dimensional, were colourful. However, since some decoration were made in a variety of substances, sometimes the decoration or even parts of wedding cake were inedible.[11] In The myth that eating the pie would bring good luck was still common but the glass ring slowly died out and the flower bouquet toss replaced it.
Wedding celebration cakes can go from the easiest to the most complex designs; each has its very own creative differences relying on the innovative juices of the baker. They ought to adapt the main objective of the cake, that whatever embellishments it possess, it can still be edible and can be eaten.
When making your own or someone elses wedding cake, timing is key. You will need to work out how much time you realistically have in the week leading up to the wedding and plan things accordingly. Decorations such as flowers, toppers and some royal icing shapes can be made quite a while beforehand to remove the stress in the immediate lead up to the big day.
We are having a very DIY wedding, in a beautiful barn, and our theme is ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’. So our cake will feature lots of beautiful flowers, perhaps with a touch of hessian and lace. I’ve been debating making my own cake toppers from fimo and I’d like to include our Chocolate Lab Meg too! Loving these M&S cake ideas – I’m currently planning on making my own cake, but it would be lovely not to have that stress! x
Melt a little marmalade in the microwave or on the stove, until it runny. Brush this over the cake, it will stick the marzipan to the cake. I find the easiest way to get the layer of marzipan draped over the cake safely is to first drape it over a rolling pin, and then roll it over the surface of the cake. Dust it with some icing sugar or cornflour first to stop it sticking.
The type of cake and tightness of time will also affect your icing decision. While it doesn't have the best taste, and is often left on the side of the plate, sugarpaste (fondant) will keep a cake fresh under it's protective layer for a couple of days, and provides a smooth, clean surface to adorn with decorations. On the other hand buttercream or ganache, while tasting delicious, should be applied as late as possible, the night before at the earliest, which could leave you panicking over last minute problems.

Verify the details of the cake as well as its cost.
Now you can attach the stamens. At this point edible glue will probably not be strong enough, so use some high tack non toxic glue such as PVA. For each seedhead you will need four or five small stamen bunches arranged evenly around the head. Glue the stamens to the base of the seed head, squeezing the end tight to the base and the wire to make them stick.
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