In Medieval England cakes were stacked as high as possible for the bride and groom to kiss over. A successful kiss meant they were guaranteed a prosperous life together.[3] From this the Croquembouche was created. The myth behind this cake tells of a Pastry chef, visiting Medieval England who witnessed their tradition of piling sweet rolls between the bride and groom, which they attempted to kiss over without knocking them all down. The pastry chef then went back to France and piled sweet rolls up into a tower to make the first Croquembouche. The modern croquembouche is still very popular in France, where it is now common to place the croquembouche tower on a bed of cake and make it a top tier. This traditional French wedding cake is built from Profiteroles and given a halo of spun sugar.[7]
Fab post with loads of ideas. I’m. Hoping to make my own New York themed wedding cake using an m&s cake. Plan to use icing to cut out the new York skyline and wrap it around a layer of the cake. Also going to make fondant yellow cabs and the post has just given me the idea to make peg versions of my partner and I – I might try to create a central park scene at the top as that is where we got engaged x

For this particular cake, both the flowers and the cake can be mad quite far in advanc, which removes a lot of stress from the weddng week itself. Like all traditional fruit cakes the cake is made in advanced and soaked in small amounts of liquor ( I used brandy) over a few weeks or months. This will be familiar to anyone who has made a christmas cake.
Take a 30 gauge wire, dip it in edible glue, and carefully insert this into the raised ridge. Gently pinch the edges of the petal to give them a little realistic frill. If you have a petal veiner, lay the petal in the venier and press down firmly. This will give the petal veins and contours to make it more realistic, This can also be acheived with some patience and a thin modellling tool.
Traditionally the bride would place a ring inside the couple's portion of the cake to symbolise acceptance of the proposal.[9] Bride's pie would evolve into the bride's cake. At this point the dessert was no longer in the form of a pie and was sweeter than its predecessor.[10] The bride cake was traditionally a plum or fruit cake. In mid-18th century, double icing, which means covering the cake first with almond icing and then with the kind of white icing, was used in bride cake.[11] White-iced upper surface of the bride cake was used as a platform on which all sorts of scenes and emblems could be mounted. The decoration was appeared, they were often at least partially three-dimensional, were colourful. However, since some decoration were made in a variety of substances, sometimes the decoration or even parts of wedding cake were inedible.[11] In The myth that eating the pie would bring good luck was still common but the glass ring slowly died out and the flower bouquet toss replaced it.

The white color has been attached to wedding ceremonies since the Victorian era when Queen Victoria chose to wear a white lace wedding dress at her wedding to Prince Albert in 1840. Queen Victoria accentuated an existing symbol, the color white being frequently associated with virginity and purity in Western culture. The wedding cake was originally known as the bride's cake therefore the color white became common because the cake needed to reflect the bride – and the expensive ingredients that the family was able to afford, such as refined white sugar.[10][unreliable source?]
For this particular cake, both the flowers and the cake can be mad quite far in advanc, which removes a lot of stress from the weddng week itself. Like all traditional fruit cakes the cake is made in advanced and soaked in small amounts of liquor ( I used brandy) over a few weeks or months. This will be familiar to anyone who has made a christmas cake.

Before you even offer to make a wedding cake for someone, make sure your heart is really, truly in it. No matter what, there will probably be moments along the way when you think, "Man, I really wish I hadn't signed up for this" or "Wow, buying a cake sure seems easy right about now." But if you're hesitant from the start, forget about it. Whether you want to do this as a unique gift for the bride and groom — and by the way, don't count on it being a cheap gift — or you love baking and see it as a fun challenge, know your reasons for committing to making a wedding cake before the sugar and flour start flying.
A tiered cake means that the weight of your top tier (or tiers if you're getting extravagant) rests on the bottom tier. To prevent everything sinking into the cake and ruining your beatifully smooth icing, you need to put in some dowels. These can be foodsafe wood or plastic and are available, like everything else, from cakecraft shops or the internet.
In terms of ornament, adornment costs run the gamut. Probably the most inexpensive option is fresh fruits or flowers that, in some cases, could be applied by your florist for a minimal fee. On the high finish are delicate gum-paste or sugar-paste flowers, that are constructed by hand, one petal at a time. However this is the bottom line: All add-ons—together with marzipan fruits, chocolate-molded flowers and lace factors—will raise the speed. (For the record, we expect it’s price the cost.)
Before you even offer to make a wedding cake for someone, make sure your heart is really, truly in it. No matter what, there will probably be moments along the way when you think, "Man, I really wish I hadn't signed up for this" or "Wow, buying a cake sure seems easy right about now." But if you're hesitant from the start, forget about it. Whether you want to do this as a unique gift for the bride and groom — and by the way, don't count on it being a cheap gift — or you love baking and see it as a fun challenge, know your reasons for committing to making a wedding cake before the sugar and flour start flying.
Phew, you did it! The hardest part is over. Time to add the final touches, like extra piping, fresh or sugar flowers, figurines, initials, marzipan or fondant fruits, and whatever else you planned. Aside from taste testing, this is the most fun step, so enjoy showing off what you can do — whether it's gorgeous freehand piping or artfully arranged fresh flowers.
Phew, you did it! The hardest part is over. Time to add the final touches, like extra piping, fresh or sugar flowers, figurines, initials, marzipan or fondant fruits, and whatever else you planned. Aside from taste testing, this is the most fun step, so enjoy showing off what you can do — whether it's gorgeous freehand piping or artfully arranged fresh flowers.
A wonderful thing about cake is that it actually improves with time in the freezer. Let your cake cool completely before wrapping it in three layers of plastic wrap. Store in the freezer for up to one month. When you're ready to fill and frost, you're going to have nice, study blocks of frozen cake to work with. It's much easier to trim, fill, and frost your cake while it's frozen. And it doesn't take that long to defrost, so you don't need to worry about the cake still being frozen when people take a bite. The few hours it takes you to fill, frost, and decorate will be sufficient.
Consider scaling back on cake slices and see if your caterer can also include a round of sweets to supplement (think: passed chocolate-covered strawberries, assorted cookies or mini truffles). Let your caterer know they should cut tasting portions to about three quarters of the usual amount, and plan to plate your cake slices with the other desserts. Ask your caterer to place slices on a buffet or cake table instead of serving a plate at every place setting—or have the staff bring bite-size pieces right to your guests on the dance floor so they can enjoy cake while getting down.
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