Sadly, your cake isn't going to be preserved in a wedding cake museum for all time — or maybe not so sadly since that would be such a big waste of butter — so be sure to take lots and lots of photos. Most wedding photographers will take lots of shots of the cake, too, and you can ask the bride or groom for those later. And make sure to get one of yourself with the cake!
Phew, you did it! The hardest part is over. Time to add the final touches, like extra piping, fresh or sugar flowers, figurines, initials, marzipan or fondant fruits, and whatever else you planned. Aside from taste testing, this is the most fun step, so enjoy showing off what you can do — whether it's gorgeous freehand piping or artfully arranged fresh flowers.

During the 16th century to the 17th century, the “bride's pie” was served at most weddings. Different from the modern sweet wedding cake, bride pie is savoury. Bride pie is a pie with pastry crust and filled an assortment of oysters, lamb testicles, pine kernels, cocks' combs from Robert May's 1685 recipe. For May's recipe, there is a compartment of bride pie which filled with live birds or a snake for the guests to pass way the time in a wedding when they cut up the pie at the table.[4] Guests were expected to have a piece out of politeness. It was considered very rude and bad luck not to eat the bride's pie. One tradition of bride's pie was to place a glass ring in the middle of the dessert and the maiden who found it would be the next to marry, similar to the modern tradition of catching the Flower bouquet.


Of course, there's no prescribed or exact timeline because everyone's engagements are different lengths—and you can successfully plan a wedding in as little as a few months if that's what you want to do. But we're here to give you a little snapshot of all your wedding to-dos to steer you in the right direction (especially if your engagement length fits the bill as "average," which is a little over a year). 
To prepare the cake tin for baking, lay it onto a sheet of baking parchment and draw around the base, then cut out the circle. Cut a long strip of parchment a little taller than your tin. Fold over one long edge of this and cut slits every inch or so. Grease the tin and line the sides with the long strip, laying the flaps on the bottom of the tin. Cover the bottom with the circle. Once fully lined, do this all over again. Double lining the tin will prevent leakage, and give a little extra insulation to the cake.
Your cake will probably be on display earlier than it is minimize and consumed. You should have a designated, well-lit desk that allows the most effective presentation doable. A spherical table is perfect for circular cakes, however a linear design may call for an oblong desk. Drape the desk with luxurious materials and embellish it with motifs, colours and flowers to match the cake and your wedding model.
Usually, wedding event cakes are is the standard cake being dished up to the guests at the morning meal after the wedding celebration. It is defined as a big cake, different from the common cakes we have on average celebrations.
Sheet Wedding Cakes – A full-size sheet cake typically feeds about 108 people. The cost at your local grocery store or warehouse discount store of a full-size sheet cake will be about $50. A 100 tiered cake would be a combined 3-tier cake. Going by the formula above, you professional wedding cake would be a minimum of $150 for 100 people. But let’s be real. Depending on what you want most professional wedding cake bakers will charge more than $1.50 per slice just for the sheer time to bake and frost a 3-tier cake.
In Europe in the 19th century, the cakes baked to serve at the christening of an infant were similar to wedding cakes. Eventually, since the wedding cakes were generally made of fruitcake, which would store well, and because the first baby often arrived within a year or so of the wedding, it became traditional to save the top part of the wedding cake to eat in celebration of the couple's first child.[30] More recently, some people freeze part of the cake and save it until the couple's first wedding anniversary.[30]
It is not so uncommon nowadays to find someone enhancing his/her own wedding event cake. In fact, it is a practical suggestion especially to those that have an extremely tight spending plan.
The modern wedding cake as we know it now would originate at the 1882 wedding of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany; his wedding cake was the first to actually be completely edible.[14] Pillars between cake tiers did not begin to appear until about 20 years later. The pillars were very poorly made from broomsticks covered in icing. The tiers represented prosperity and were a status symbol because only wealthy families could afford to include them in the cake.[3] Prince Leopold's wedding cake was created in separate layers with very dense icing. When the icing would harden the tiers could be stacked, a groundbreaking innovation for wedding cakes at the time. Modern wedding cakes still use this method, with an added form of support with dowels imbedded in the cake to help carry the load especially of larger cakes.[citation needed]
We are having a very DIY wedding, in a beautiful barn, and our theme is ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’. So our cake will feature lots of beautiful flowers, perhaps with a touch of hessian and lace. I’ve been debating making my own cake toppers from fimo and I’d like to include our Chocolate Lab Meg too! Loving these M&S cake ideas – I’m currently planning on making my own cake, but it would be lovely not to have that stress! x
In the 17th century, two cakes were made, one for the bride and one for the groom. The groom's cake would die out and the bride's cake become the main cake for the event. When the two cakes were served together, the groom's cake was typically the darker colored, rich fruit cake and generally much smaller than the bride's cake. The bride's cake was usually a simple pound cake with white icing because white was a sign of virginity and purity.[3]
Once cooked, leave the cake to cool in the tin. When cool, remove from the tin and place on some baking parchment. Drizzle a couple of tablespoons of brandy (or your other chosen liquor) over the cake and wrap it up tightly in parchment and clingfilm or foil. Every few days unwrap the cake to feed it with another spoonful of liquor, then wrap it back up and return to a safe, temperate storage space.
Once the marzipan is draped over the cake, gently pull down the sides to cover any gaps. Smooth the flat of your hand down the sides, pressing the marzipan to the cake and amoothing out any creases or overlaps, Rub the flat of your hand or a cake smoother over the top firmly to flatten and smooth the surface. Smooth out the sides in the same way. Trim off any excess marzipan around the bottom of the cake with a sharp knife and peel it off the board. This can be kept in an airtight bag or container for use next time.
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