Cake supply takes coordination (and normally a refrigerated van), so give your self peace of thoughts and decide to have your cake delivered. Advanced truffles might not essentially arrive in final type, so allow time and house for assembly. And guarantee that once the masterpiece is delivered, it has a place at the venue (particularly if it requires refrigeration). Bottom line: Focus on all of the supply particulars together with your baker earlier than signing the contract.
Our wedding is a diy affair. The cake is going to be my fellas job. He’s an engineer, so wants to build a crane that will be lifting the top teir inti place/hovering it above the rest of the cake. It’s a chance for him to put his personality onto something. He also wants to use his new laser cutter to design and make a bespoke topper. Winning the cake would be amazing snd give him the time and confidence to concentrate on these decorative features. Xx
In Europe in the 19th century, the cakes baked to serve at the christening of an infant were similar to wedding cakes. Eventually, since the wedding cakes were generally made of fruitcake, which would store well, and because the first baby often arrived within a year or so of the wedding, it became traditional to save the top part of the wedding cake to eat in celebration of the couple's first child.[30] More recently, some people freeze part of the cake and save it until the couple's first wedding anniversary.[30]
Sugar flowers, tall tiers and intricate piping can quickly jack up the price of your cake. That's because most cake bakers price their work by "touch time," which is the amount of labor and number of hours spent designing the cake. (There's a lot that goes into this confection—it's way more than just flour and eggs!) So when it comes to choosing your cake style, look for designs you love that don't include any over-the-top add-ons. 
Buttercream or fondant? Buttercream is often much more scrumptious. But if you love the graceful, nearly surreal-like look of fondant, think about frosting the cake in buttercream first and then including a layer of fondant over the complete confection. Whatever kind of icing you select, stick to colors your guests will want to eat. In case your wedding hues are blue and inexperienced, go for a white cake with delicate green-frosted accents.

For me, the cake is the easy part. But I don't have the patience or skill to make thousands of fondant flowers or smooth buttercream perfectly. That's why I always choose foolproof, classic decorations like satin ribbon (be sure to cover the back with clear plastic tape so the fabric doesn't become greasy, and secure with a pearl-headed pin) and fresh flowers. Covering frosting with shredded coconut or white chocolate curls is another easy way to hide imperfections. I've also seen a gorgeous wedding cake covered in rainbow sprinkles. This frosting that looks like a cloud is simple but looks dreamy. Another rustic style I really like that favors the lazy froster is having a "naked" cake, with filling and frosting on the top, but little to no frosting on the sides. Choose decoration you feel comfortable doing and remember that simple is usually better.
Different types of cakes have been popular in different countries and at different times. In some countries, such as Italy, different couples choose different types of cake, according to their preferences.[16] In others, a single type is chosen by most people. Even when a type is preferred within a culture, the preferred type may change significantly over time. For example, the traditional wedding cake in Korea was a rice cake topped with a powder made from red beans, but now guests are likely to see a sponge cake and fresh fruit.[16]
Traditionally the bride would place a ring inside the couple's portion of the cake to symbolise acceptance of the proposal.[9] Bride's pie would evolve into the bride's cake. At this point the dessert was no longer in the form of a pie and was sweeter than its predecessor.[10] The bride cake was traditionally a plum or fruit cake. In mid-18th century, double icing, which means covering the cake first with almond icing and then with the kind of white icing, was used in bride cake.[11] White-iced upper surface of the bride cake was used as a platform on which all sorts of scenes and emblems could be mounted. The decoration was appeared, they were often at least partially three-dimensional, were colourful. However, since some decoration were made in a variety of substances, sometimes the decoration or even parts of wedding cake were inedible.[11] In The myth that eating the pie would bring good luck was still common but the glass ring slowly died out and the flower bouquet toss replaced it.
If the wedding couple is excited for a homemade cake, hooray! Ask them if they have wedding colors and what styles they like. You can look at photos of cakes online together or have them send you a few photos for inspiration. Make sure you understand their vision of their reception so your cake fits in with the rest of the décor. Keep in touch throughout the process, but don't badger them with questions — a cake is just one of many things they have to plan.
There are many lovely and unique ways to high your cake. You probably have an heirloom piece—particularly a superb porcelain vintage—work together with your baker to combine it into the cake’s design. It will probably double as your “something outdated.” Different alternate options embrace a bouquet of sugar flowers, a cascade of icing ribbons or even a sugar block carved to reveal your new monogram. Look to your locale as properly. A cluster of coral can look gorgeous for a beachside celebration, or attempt a fondant snowflake for a winter wedding. Or don’t use one in any respect—some designs look great with out a topper.
In Medieval England cakes were stacked as high as possible for the bride and groom to kiss over. A successful kiss meant they were guaranteed a prosperous life together.[3] From this the Croquembouche was created. The myth behind this cake tells of a Pastry chef, visiting Medieval England who witnessed their tradition of piling sweet rolls between the bride and groom, which they attempted to kiss over without knocking them all down. The pastry chef then went back to France and piled sweet rolls up into a tower to make the first Croquembouche. The modern croquembouche is still very popular in France, where it is now common to place the croquembouche tower on a bed of cake and make it a top tier. This traditional French wedding cake is built from Profiteroles and given a halo of spun sugar.[7]

Sadly, your cake isn't going to be preserved in a wedding cake museum for all time — or maybe not so sadly since that would be such a big waste of butter — so be sure to take lots and lots of photos. Most wedding photographers will take lots of shots of the cake, too, and you can ask the bride or groom for those later. And make sure to get one of yourself with the cake!
Wedding cake toppers are models or art pieces that sit atop the cake. In the US, the most common type of cake topper features a representation of a bride and groom in wedding attire. This custom was dominant in US weddings in the 1950s, where it represented togetherness.[27] Wedding toppers may also be figures that indicate shared hobbies or other passions, if they are used at all.[27] Some are humorous, or may represent the couple's hobby or occupation. In Mexico, the wedding topper and other decorations tell a story about the couple's history.[16]
Now you can attach the stamens. At this point edible glue will probably not be strong enough, so use some high tack non toxic glue such as PVA. For each seedhead you will need four or five small stamen bunches arranged evenly around the head. Glue the stamens to the base of the seed head, squeezing the end tight to the base and the wire to make them stick.

I usually fill and frost the cake the day before the wedding, so there's plenty of time to fix mistakes. Using a serrated bread knife or cake leveler, trim your first frozen cake layer so it is as level as possible. Place the cake on a cake board with about a half-inch clearance on all sides (you can always trim the cake board down if you don't use that much frosting). Pipe a circle of frosting around the circumference of the cake, and then neatly pipe in your filling. Place the next layer on top, and repeat until all the layers in this tier are stacked. Then use your icing spatula to apply a thin "crumb coat" of frosting all over the cake. Put this tier in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to set. After 30 minutes, you can apply your top layer of buttercream or smooth fondant over the cake if you're using it. Repeat with all your tiers.


Brilliant, some really fantastic ideas. We have been thinking about getting the cheese tiered cake from M&S and decorating it ourselves but I now really love the idea of getting these cakes and decorating it. We’ve got two little birds to sit on top of our cake (whatever cake we eventually choose) that are actually ring holders! They’d look lovely on top of this M&S cake with some flowers and lace. Thank you, I feel inspired!
Its no surprise that this was one of the favourites on the day. If you or your man are a lego fan then this is one for you. We purchased a lego bride and groom topper from eBay and placed these on the top. Then to add to the fun we placed a few of our other favourite characters as guests at the wedding. Who doesn’t want a hot dog man at their wedding?!
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