Sadly, your cake isn't going to be preserved in a wedding cake museum for all time — or maybe not so sadly since that would be such a big waste of butter — so be sure to take lots and lots of photos. Most wedding photographers will take lots of shots of the cake, too, and you can ask the bride or groom for those later. And make sure to get one of yourself with the cake!
The bride's cake would transform into the modern wedding cake we know today.[3] In the early 19th century, sugar became easier to obtain during the time when the bride's cakes became popular. The more refined and whiter sugars were still very expensive. so only wealthy families could afford to have a very pure white frosting. This display would show the wealth and social status of the family.[12] When Queen Victoria used white icing on her cake it gained a new title, royal icing.[13]

If the wedding couple is excited for a homemade cake, hooray! Ask them if they have wedding colors and what styles they like. You can look at photos of cakes online together or have them send you a few photos for inspiration. Make sure you understand their vision of their reception so your cake fits in with the rest of the décor. Keep in touch throughout the process, but don't badger them with questions — a cake is just one of many things they have to plan.
The Eye candy opponent in the shape of a wedding event cake is the only hazard the new bride has to contend with on her special day in looking excellent. Wedding celebration cakes have actually become a necessary decoration at wedding locations where visitors still thrill themselves over just how splendid the wedding cake is. Choosing the right cake if done scrupulously is as easy as walking down the aisle.
In Europe in the 19th century, the cakes baked to serve at the christening of an infant were similar to wedding cakes. Eventually, since the wedding cakes were generally made of fruitcake, which would store well, and because the first baby often arrived within a year or so of the wedding, it became traditional to save the top part of the wedding cake to eat in celebration of the couple's first child.[30] More recently, some people freeze part of the cake and save it until the couple's first wedding anniversary.[30]
The bride's cake would transform into the modern wedding cake we know today.[3] In the early 19th century, sugar became easier to obtain during the time when the bride's cakes became popular. The more refined and whiter sugars were still very expensive. so only wealthy families could afford to have a very pure white frosting. This display would show the wealth and social status of the family.[12] When Queen Victoria used white icing on her cake it gained a new title, royal icing.[13]
Verify the details of the cake as well as its cost.

Sizing available to accommodate any number of guests in your event. Below are some of the common sizes offered as well as the LIMITED flavor and filling combinations.   The entire cake is the same flavor throughout.  No changes in design can be made to these cakes except for highlight colors, flower colors and ribbon colors.  Fresh flowers, cake toppers, fabric ribbon is provided by the bride to us for application.

Music and surfing and two key themes we’d like to use for our wedding – it would be great to replicate musical notes and waves in a subtle way on our cake perhaps with flowers too. We will be having a DIY wedding in Cornwall where we met (in a surf lesson, very cheesy I know!), and I love the thought of putting our own touches onto a cake that can represent us 🙂
The typical style for a modern white wedding is a decorated white layer cake. It is usually coated and decorated with frosting. The layers may be filled with frosting, or other cake fillings. It may be topped by cake decorations made with edible flowers and other edible decorations. A layer cake can be a single cake, or it can be assembled to form a tiered cake. The tiers of the wedding cake can be either separate or together, with fake or real flowers or plastic cake toppers for the top tiers.
The modern wedding cake as we know it now would originate at the 1882 wedding of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany; his wedding cake was the first to actually be completely edible.[14] Pillars between cake tiers did not begin to appear until about 20 years later. The pillars were very poorly made from broomsticks covered in icing. The tiers represented prosperity and were a status symbol because only wealthy families could afford to include them in the cake.[3] Prince Leopold's wedding cake was created in separate layers with very dense icing. When the icing would harden the tiers could be stacked, a groundbreaking innovation for wedding cakes at the time. Modern wedding cakes still use this method, with an added form of support with dowels imbedded in the cake to help carry the load especially of larger cakes.[citation needed]
For me, the cake is the easy part. But I don't have the patience or skill to make thousands of fondant flowers or smooth buttercream perfectly. That's why I always choose foolproof, classic decorations like satin ribbon (be sure to cover the back with clear plastic tape so the fabric doesn't become greasy, and secure with a pearl-headed pin) and fresh flowers. Covering frosting with shredded coconut or white chocolate curls is another easy way to hide imperfections. I've also seen a gorgeous wedding cake covered in rainbow sprinkles. This frosting that looks like a cloud is simple but looks dreamy. Another rustic style I really like that favors the lazy froster is having a "naked" cake, with filling and frosting on the top, but little to no frosting on the sides. Choose decoration you feel comfortable doing and remember that simple is usually better.

Wedding celebration cakes can go from the easiest to the most complex designs; each has its very own creative differences relying on the innovative juices of the baker. They ought to adapt the main objective of the cake, that whatever embellishments it possess, it can still be edible and can be eaten.
Schedule of cake designers may be limited at the bakeshop of your selection so make certain to check this out prior to wrapping up any decisions on exactly how you want your cake to look. A very early chat with the cake baker to talk over the layout and flavour is a wise step and also should be done a minimum of 6 months prior to the set date therefore offering him/her plenty of time to develop the perfect wedding celebration cake. You may need to pay a down payment fee for appointment.
So, alloted some unique decisive moment when it comes to your wedding celebration cake due to the fact that there would be no better method to glamorize your wedding event than to have a flawlessly made wedding cake.

The modern wedding cake as we know it now would originate at the 1882 wedding of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany; his wedding cake was the first to actually be completely edible.[14] Pillars between cake tiers did not begin to appear until about 20 years later. The pillars were very poorly made from broomsticks covered in icing. The tiers represented prosperity and were a status symbol because only wealthy families could afford to include them in the cake.[3] Prince Leopold's wedding cake was created in separate layers with very dense icing. When the icing would harden the tiers could be stacked, a groundbreaking innovation for wedding cakes at the time. Modern wedding cakes still use this method, with an added form of support with dowels imbedded in the cake to help carry the load especially of larger cakes.[citation needed]

Covering a cake in marzipan uses exactly the same method as covering it in fondant. Stick the cake to the cake board with a small ball of marzipan. Now, take roughly enough marzipan to cover your cake. This can be hard to judge and is a matter of practise, so if in doubt always use more. Knead the marzipan a little, until it is smooth and pliable. Roll it out into a rough circular shape, about half a centimetre thick.
Buttercream or fondant? Buttercream is often much more scrumptious. But if you love the graceful, nearly surreal-like look of fondant, think about frosting the cake in buttercream first and then including a layer of fondant over the complete confection. Whatever kind of icing you select, stick to colors your guests will want to eat. In case your wedding hues are blue and inexperienced, go for a white cake with delicate green-frosted accents.
Even if you see tiny imperfections in your cake, I promise you that nobody else will. The bride and groom will love their unique gift, and their wedding guests are going to be super impressed by the fact that you baked an entire wedding cake and by how delicious it tastes. No one will notice or care if one tiny part of the fondant is rumpled or your flowers turned out a brighter yellow than you expected.
Fruitcake may be traditional, but it’s by no means everyone’s favourite. When you’ve chosen your cake maker, ask for a tasting consultation so that you can try the different flavours on offer. Choose one to use throughout or go for something different on every tier, the choice is entirely yours. We would recommend thinking of your guests at least a little since your wedding cake will almost always be shared.

Its no surprise that this was one of the favourites on the day. If you or your man are a lego fan then this is one for you. We purchased a lego bride and groom topper from eBay and placed these on the top. Then to add to the fun we placed a few of our other favourite characters as guests at the wedding. Who doesn’t want a hot dog man at their wedding?!
Look at the size of time required for you in ordering your wedding event cake.
Whether you are a DIY bride or a very generous friend, making a homemade wedding cake for the first time can be intimidating. There is naturally a bit of a trial and error involved in the process, but you still need your first wedding cake to turn out perfectly — after all, it's for someone's wedding! I've made three wedding cakes now, including my own, and along the way I've learned two key rules: plan ahead and be flexible. No matter how much you plan, problems are going to arise. A frosting that's come out fluffy and sturdy 10 times may randomly end up watery, your biggest cake layer may stick to the pan, and you may run out of strawberries on the day you're filling the cake. But as long as you can keep a level head and get creative on the fly, everything will turn out great. Here's my step-by-step guide to making a homemade wedding cake.
Unless you’re a keen baker, the wealth of different icing choices available to you may well have been a mystery until now. Naked, semi-naked and buttercream cakes are all increasing in popularity by the day, but there’s still a place for the more traditional fondant and royal icing decorations on cakes. You might even want to combine several. Think fondant sugar flowers atop a buttercream cake or delicate royal icing piping to add detail to a fondant covering. More flavour choices are possible with buttercream, but it is also more likely to melt in the warmer summer temperatures, so be sure to take this into account.

To cover the edge of the board, roll some fondant into a long sausage, and roll this out into a flat strip. Trim one long edge with a sharp knife to give a crisp edge. Dust the icing with cornflour and roll it up. Brush the board with a little water and unroll the icing strip around it, pushing it up to meet the bottom edge of the cake. Cut the strip when it meets the first end, and smooth out the join with your fingertips. Using you hand or the cake smoother, smooth out the icing on the board, Use a sharp knife to trim the excess from the edge of the board. Smooth down the edge with your finger tips.


For a bride on a budget, paying a large sum of money for a wedding cake may seem completely outrageous. But what are the alternatives, particularly when you don't have any baking experts in your family? Turns out, making a wedding cake is not as difficult as one might think. There is some significant planning and effort that will need to happen, so make sure you carefully weigh the expense of a cake versus your time (and expectations) as you make your final decisions. And if the cake isn't your thing, you can always serve pie, ice cream, or even an ice cream sundae bar at your wedding.
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