To prepare the cake tin for baking, lay it onto a sheet of baking parchment and draw around the base, then cut out the circle. Cut a long strip of parchment a little taller than your tin. Fold over one long edge of this and cut slits every inch or so. Grease the tin and line the sides with the long strip, laying the flaps on the bottom of the tin. Cover the bottom with the circle. Once fully lined, do this all over again. Double lining the tin will prevent leakage, and give a little extra insulation to the cake.
Royal icing is made with sugar and egg white or meringue powder. It hardens to a firm finish that can be piped or thinned for "flood work". It hardens fast and is ideal for making detailed shapes ahead of time. It can also be piped directly onto cake tiers and works beautifully for delicate work.[1] a few things to consider when working with royal icing: You must use grease free utensils. Humidity also affects the consistency of royal icing. a well known British cake decorator uses royal icing as a medium, Joseph Lambeth developed a style by creating layered scrolls with Royal Icing.
The typical style for a modern white wedding is a decorated white layer cake. It is usually coated and decorated with frosting. The layers may be filled with frosting, or other cake fillings. It may be topped by cake decorations made with edible flowers and other edible decorations. A layer cake can be a single cake, or it can be assembled to form a tiered cake. The tiers of the wedding cake can be either separate or together, with fake or real flowers or plastic cake toppers for the top tiers.
Before you head to the grocery store, do your best to calculate how much of each ingredient you need. When scaling up a recipe, be sure to scale by area, not diameter of the pans. Make a list, and then buy one extra container of everything. You can always return unopened groceries, and you'll be so glad if you don't have to run out for more ingredients at the last minute.
When out buying don't think twice to ask for cake sample flavours, the appearance and also flavour of the cake itself is essential so. Some pastry shop stores will be only to happy to require.
i used them for a baroque wedding cake i made a few months ago. it was a four-tiered rectangular cake (each stack placed at different angles atop one another) and was covered in fondant painted in gold/red stripes. then i placed the poppies around the corners of the tiers. they weren't as vivid as yours though :( - ill try making them with red gumpaste/fondant next time.
My boyfriend and I are actually thinking of customising an M&S cake for our wedding cake – the plan is to make fondant icing safari animals to place around the sides and then we have Ryu and Chun-Li figurines (from the Street Fighter computer game) to put on top to hopefully make it look a bit like a stage of the computer game. It’s not really part of a theme as such, just something that we both happen to love!
The modern wedding cake as we know it now would originate at the 1882 wedding of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany; his wedding cake was the first to actually be completely edible.[14] Pillars between cake tiers did not begin to appear until about 20 years later. The pillars were very poorly made from broomsticks covered in icing. The tiers represented prosperity and were a status symbol because only wealthy families could afford to include them in the cake.[3] Prince Leopold's wedding cake was created in separate layers with very dense icing. When the icing would harden the tiers could be stacked, a groundbreaking innovation for wedding cakes at the time. Modern wedding cakes still use this method, with an added form of support with dowels imbedded in the cake to help carry the load especially of larger cakes.[citation needed]
There are many lovely and unique ways to high your cake. You probably have an heirloom piece—particularly a superb porcelain vintage—work together with your baker to combine it into the cake’s design. It will probably double as your “something outdated.” Different alternate options embrace a bouquet of sugar flowers, a cascade of icing ribbons or even a sugar block carved to reveal your new monogram. Look to your locale as properly. A cluster of coral can look gorgeous for a beachside celebration, or attempt a fondant snowflake for a winter wedding. Or don’t use one in any respect—some designs look great with out a topper.
Because the wedding cake is such an important part in the wedding event, right here are some suggestions you need to know in case you will be getting a wedding celebration cake in the future.
This code deducts £50 off your Wedding Flowers order when you spend £150 or more on Wedding Cakes. Valid at marksandspencer.com only from 12/05/15 until 23:59 30/06/15. Discount will be applied at the checkout. Offer excludes Wedding Favours, Decorations, Wedding Arrangements and Wedding Plants. Decorations are not included as the price applies only to the plain cake. This code can only be used once. Offer strictly non-transferable and cannot be sold or exchanged for cash. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other voucher or code. Any refunds will be taken into account this discount. M&S reserves the right to reject this voucher code with reasonable cause.
Use an online calculator to determine what size cake to make. This can be a little tricky, as it's dependent on both what shape cake pans you choose, as well as how many people will be at the wedding. Know that wedding cake servings are usually smaller than regular cake servings. Start by asking how many people the couple is expecting at the reception and whether there will there be other desserts or just cake. You definitely don't want to run out of cake, but you also don't want to go to the trouble of making a five-tier cake only to have four tiers leftover at the end of the night. For a very large reception (200+), consider making a smaller wedding cake and then baking sheet cakes to make up the rest of the cake you need. Also, ask the bride and groom if they plan to keep the top tier as a memento. Some couples may want to follow the tradition of freezing that cake and eating it on their first anniversary.
Another way to save money on your cake is to skip an outer layer of frosting. Naked cakes are not only gorgeous to look at, they're actually pretty practical too. They're a lot less expensive because they use less buttercream and take less time—it's as simple as that. To make up for the lack of frosting on the outside, up the wow factor on the inside by experimenting with unique flavors and fillings, like lemon curd, champagne buttercream or chocolate ganache with toasted almonds.

Planning your time can affect everything about your cake, right down to the flavour. Filled sponge cakes are best baked as close to the day as possible, and baking enough for a couple of tiers can take a lot of hours in mixing, baking and cooling. Opting for a traditional fruit cake, on the other hand, allows you to make the cake in advance. In fact this is preferable since an important step in making fruit cake is feeding it with a regular spoonful of brandy or sherry every few days for at least a couple of weeks, to make it gorgeously moist and alcoholic.
You’ll need a cake that is appropriate with the look of your venue, the season, your marriage ceremony robe, the flower arrangements and the menu. Arrive at your cake session prepared—you need not have a whole sketch in hand, however data of basic phrases will make it easier on everybody. And if you happen to’re searching for a customized design, bring alongside inspiration, like a swatch of lace from your gown or a picture of your marriage ceremony china.
Depending on what kind of filling you're using, it can usually be made well in advance. But some frostings need to be made closer to when the cake will be served. Between the recipe and your practice cakes, you should have a sense of how early the filling and frosting can be made and how long they'll hold up. Once again, overestimate how much you need. Plan to bring an extra pastry bag of frosting to the wedding site to patch up any little cracks that happen while transporting the cake.
Take a 30 gauge wire, dip it in edible glue, and carefully insert this into the raised ridge. Gently pinch the edges of the petal to give them a little realistic frill. If you have a petal veiner, lay the petal in the venier and press down firmly. This will give the petal veins and contours to make it more realistic, This can also be acheived with some patience and a thin modellling tool.
A wedding cake is the traditional cake served at wedding receptions following dinner. In some parts of England, the wedding cake is served at a wedding breakfast; the 'wedding breakfast' does not mean the meal will be held in the morning, but at a time following the ceremony on the same day. In modern Western culture, the cake is usually on display and served to guests at the reception. Traditionally, wedding cakes were made to bring good luck to all guests and the couple. Modernly however, they are more of a centerpiece to the wedding and are not always even served to the guests. Some cakes are built with only a single edible tier for the bride and groom to share, but this is rare since the cost difference between fake and real tiers is minimal.
I’ve heard SUCH great things about M&S wedding cakes, and as we’re trying to do most of our August wedding ourselves it seems the obvious option! I’ll be ordering in the next few weeks, so this would be a HUGE help. We’re going for three tiers, with lots of burlap and flowers to match the theme of the rest of the day…but it’s a military wedding, so there’ll be some little military Lego men on the top too!
Traditionally the bride would place a ring inside the couple's portion of the cake to symbolise acceptance of the proposal.[9] Bride's pie would evolve into the bride's cake. At this point the dessert was no longer in the form of a pie and was sweeter than its predecessor.[10] The bride cake was traditionally a plum or fruit cake. In mid-18th century, double icing, which means covering the cake first with almond icing and then with the kind of white icing, was used in bride cake.[11] White-iced upper surface of the bride cake was used as a platform on which all sorts of scenes and emblems could be mounted. The decoration was appeared, they were often at least partially three-dimensional, were colourful. However, since some decoration were made in a variety of substances, sometimes the decoration or even parts of wedding cake were inedible.[11] In The myth that eating the pie would bring good luck was still common but the glass ring slowly died out and the flower bouquet toss replaced it.
Wedding cake was originally a luxury item, and a sign of celebration and social status. The bigger the cake, the higher the social standing. Wedding cakes in England and early America were traditionally fruit cakes, often topped with marzipan and icing with tiers, Cutting the cake was an important part of the reception. White icing was also a symbol of money and social importance in Victorian times, so a white cake was highly desired.[5] Today, many flavors and configurations are available in addition to the traditional all-white tiered cake.[6]

Another thing to note about cakes, the more detailed the cake design, the higher the price will be.  And, just because a cake looks like a “simple” design, doesn’t mean that it is.  I know there are  many amazing cakes online, and in magazines and with cake artists pushing cake design to new limits, it’s easy to fall in love with so many of the beautiful cakes we all see.  Things like hand painting, edible gold, sugar flowers, tons of little sugar pearls on the cake, all translate into beautiful designs, but also a higher cake cost.  Some of these cakes can run as much as $15 per serving…gasp!  But think about it, you go out to dinner at a chain restaurant and pay $15 for a so so meal, that was probably frozen and took about 20 minutes to make.   A cake artist can spend HOURS from start to finish on your wedding cake, and we think our time is worth it.  Cake decorating is an art and not just anyone can do it.  Not to mention ingredient costs, like fresh fruit, butter and eggs!  That stuff is expensive!

Because the wedding cake is such an important part in the wedding event, right here are some suggestions you need to know in case you will be getting a wedding celebration cake in the future.

I love all of these ideas, so much fun and so different. Can never go wrong with an M&S cake! We are planning on having this same cake for our wedding and also a Collins the caterpillar cake as that’s both of our favorite cake (reminds us of being little!!). Our idea for the cake is to have a cat bride and groom sylvanian families animals as our cake toppe (happy childhood memories)…then the rest of the cake will have flowers and ivy on with a lace boarder. We like the gaps in between the cake layers to add the flowers. It will hopefully go with our relaxed barn wedding with our DIY nature/ rustic theme. We both love animals and our first home together backs onto woods. So we would like to incorporate that into our day. I have already bought a beautiful antique pink glass cake stand ☺
Create a step-by-step, day-by-day schedule for the wedding week. Plan which day or days you will bake, make the filling and frosting, and assemble. The more planning and shopping you do in advance, the less likely you are to run into big problems the week of the wedding. Think through what you need to bring if you're traveling to the city where the cake will be baked, where you are baking the cake, and whether there's space in the fridge and/or freezer for storing cake layers and tiers before they're assembled. If you're using fresh flowers, plan for them to be delivered or decide where you're going to purchase them.
Once cooked, leave the cake to cool in the tin. When cool, remove from the tin and place on some baking parchment. Drizzle a couple of tablespoons of brandy (or your other chosen liquor) over the cake and wrap it up tightly in parchment and clingfilm or foil. Every few days unwrap the cake to feed it with another spoonful of liquor, then wrap it back up and return to a safe, temperate storage space.
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