There are many lovely and unique ways to high your cake. You probably have an heirloom piece—particularly a superb porcelain vintage—work together with your baker to combine it into the cake’s design. It will probably double as your “something outdated.” Different alternate options embrace a bouquet of sugar flowers, a cascade of icing ribbons or even a sugar block carved to reveal your new monogram. Look to your locale as properly. A cluster of coral can look gorgeous for a beachside celebration, or attempt a fondant snowflake for a winter wedding. Or don’t use one in any respect—some designs look great with out a topper.
Royal icing is made with sugar and egg white or meringue powder. It hardens to a firm finish that can be piped or thinned for "flood work". It hardens fast and is ideal for making detailed shapes ahead of time. It can also be piped directly onto cake tiers and works beautifully for delicate work.[1] a few things to consider when working with royal icing: You must use grease free utensils. Humidity also affects the consistency of royal icing. a well known British cake decorator uses royal icing as a medium, Joseph Lambeth developed a style by creating layered scrolls with Royal Icing.
It would certainly be far better to remove it out with your baker just how a lot will be the cost of every decor are added features you wish to add on your wedding event cake.
In many cases, wedding event cakes are multi-layered or split and are heftily decorated with topping, grains, and other decorations that would mirror the special of the event. On the top is a small photo of a bride and groom.
At this point, you have done everything you can until the cake is on the cake stand at the wedding site. Put the tiers in cake boxes in the fridge until you're ready to go. Once you've transported the cakes to the wedding site while inevitably freaking out over every bump in the road, keep the cake out of the heat in a cool spot for as long as possible. Set up your cake stand on a moving table or at its final destination in the reception hall. Finally, gently stack the tiers — it can help to have some extra help for this sometimes nerve-wracking step. If you assemble your tiers and think, "Hmm, that looks lopsided," then frosting is your friend! Don't be afraid to remove a tier, add more frosting to level out the top of the tier below, and then put the cake back together.

In some areas, particularly the American South, two cakes are presented at weddings. Usually, a large, white tiered cake, decorated mostly in white frosting, is called the bride's cake, and a second flavor choice is called the "groom's cake". This tradition was brought over from England by early American colonists,[citation needed] who considered the white-iced bride's cake too light for men's tastes. The groom's cake was usually a dark, liquor-soaked fruitcake. More recently, groom's cakes are usually chocolate or another of his favorite flavors. The groom's cake may be decorated or shaped as something significant to him, such as a hobby item, sports team or symbol of his occupation. The movie Steel Magnolias included a red velvet groom's cake in the shape of a giant armadillo.

Use an online calculator to determine what size cake to make. This can be a little tricky, as it's dependent on both what shape cake pans you choose, as well as how many people will be at the wedding. Know that wedding cake servings are usually smaller than regular cake servings. Start by asking how many people the couple is expecting at the reception and whether there will there be other desserts or just cake. You definitely don't want to run out of cake, but you also don't want to go to the trouble of making a five-tier cake only to have four tiers leftover at the end of the night. For a very large reception (200+), consider making a smaller wedding cake and then baking sheet cakes to make up the rest of the cake you need. Also, ask the bride and groom if they plan to keep the top tier as a memento. Some couples may want to follow the tradition of freezing that cake and eating it on their first anniversary.


Now you can attach the stamens. At this point edible glue will probably not be strong enough, so use some high tack non toxic glue such as PVA. For each seedhead you will need four or five small stamen bunches arranged evenly around the head. Glue the stamens to the base of the seed head, squeezing the end tight to the base and the wire to make them stick.


I love all of these ideas, so much fun and so different. Can never go wrong with an M&S cake! We are planning on having this same cake for our wedding and also a Collins the caterpillar cake as that’s both of our favorite cake (reminds us of being little!!). Our idea for the cake is to have a cat bride and groom sylvanian families animals as our cake toppe (happy childhood memories)…then the rest of the cake will have flowers and ivy on with a lace boarder. We like the gaps in between the cake layers to add the flowers. It will hopefully go with our relaxed barn wedding with our DIY nature/ rustic theme. We both love animals and our first home together backs onto woods. So we would like to incorporate that into our day. I have already bought a beautiful antique pink glass cake stand ☺
Wedding cake was originally a luxury item, and a sign of celebration and social status. The bigger the cake, the higher the social standing. Wedding cakes in England and early America were traditionally fruit cakes, often topped with marzipan and icing with tiers, Cutting the cake was an important part of the reception. White icing was also a symbol of money and social importance in Victorian times, so a white cake was highly desired.[5] Today, many flavors and configurations are available in addition to the traditional all-white tiered cake.[6]

A tiered cake means that the weight of your top tier (or tiers if you're getting extravagant) rests on the bottom tier. To prevent everything sinking into the cake and ruining your beatifully smooth icing, you need to put in some dowels. These can be foodsafe wood or plastic and are available, like everything else, from cakecraft shops or the internet.
In Medieval England cakes were stacked as high as possible for the bride and groom to kiss over. A successful kiss meant they were guaranteed a prosperous life together.[3] From this the Croquembouche was created. The myth behind this cake tells of a Pastry chef, visiting Medieval England who witnessed their tradition of piling sweet rolls between the bride and groom, which they attempted to kiss over without knocking them all down. The pastry chef then went back to France and piled sweet rolls up into a tower to make the first Croquembouche. The modern croquembouche is still very popular in France, where it is now common to place the croquembouche tower on a bed of cake and make it a top tier. This traditional French wedding cake is built from Profiteroles and given a halo of spun sugar.[7]
It's possible to make a wedding cake without a stand mixer, but I wouldn't recommend it. They can be expensive, so if you don't own one, try to borrow one. If this is your first wedding cake, you're going to need to buy some large cake pans. Cake pans in lots of sizes and shapes can be easily ordered online in sets. You may also want to buy a set of cake strips to help keep your cakes flat and level. Cake strips are soaked in ice water and wrapped around the outside of the cake pan to keep the outside from cooking faster than the middle. They're especially helpful for large cakes. A rotating turntable and frosting spatula will make it much easier to get frosting on smoothly. Piping bags and tips are useful for both filling and decoration, but if you're not piping decoration, you can simply snip off the corner of a Ziploc bag. Cake boards under each tier and plastic dowel rods are necessary to build a multi-tier cake that won't sink. Cake boxes can be useful for storing and transporting cake tiers. If you're using fresh flowers, plastic holders keep inedible flowers off your frosting. Buy parchment paper — so the cake won't stick to the pan, and plastic wrap — so it stays moist in the freezer or fridge after baking.
You might not get tons of tiers, intricate patterns or realistic-looking sugar flowers, but if you love your local bakery, ask if they'd be willing to make your wedding cake. Because they're not a wedding-specific bakery, you may have more limited design choices—but the savings can be big. Otherwise, ask your caterer if they include cakes in their packages. Sometimes if you order your cake from your caterer, the overall cost will be lower. Some caterers even require you to use them, and if you don't, they'll charge a fee for bringing in another baker. So do a little cost comparison to snag the best deal.
A wedding cake is the traditional cake served at wedding receptions following dinner. In some parts of England, the wedding cake is served at a wedding breakfast; the 'wedding breakfast' does not mean the meal will be held in the morning, but at a time following the ceremony on the same day. In modern Western culture, the cake is usually on display and served to guests at the reception. Traditionally, wedding cakes were made to bring good luck to all guests and the couple. Modernly however, they are more of a centerpiece to the wedding and are not always even served to the guests. Some cakes are built with only a single edible tier for the bride and groom to share, but this is rare since the cost difference between fake and real tiers is minimal.

Even in the event you take essentially the most painstaking packaging measures, consuming the top tier of your cake on your first anniversary sounds much better than it tastes. Think about indulging in your two-week or one-month anniversary, and deal with yourself to a fresh cake in the identical taste once you’ve hit the one-year mark. If you should adhere to custom, tightly wrap the cake in plastic wrap, then place it in an hermetic baggie.

You might not get tons of tiers, intricate patterns or realistic-looking sugar flowers, but if you love your local bakery, ask if they'd be willing to make your wedding cake. Because they're not a wedding-specific bakery, you may have more limited design choices—but the savings can be big. Otherwise, ask your caterer if they include cakes in their packages. Sometimes if you order your cake from your caterer, the overall cost will be lower. Some caterers even require you to use them, and if you don't, they'll charge a fee for bringing in another baker. So do a little cost comparison to snag the best deal.
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