We are having a very DIY wedding, in a beautiful barn, and our theme is ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’. So our cake will feature lots of beautiful flowers, perhaps with a touch of hessian and lace. I’ve been debating making my own cake toppers from fimo and I’d like to include our Chocolate Lab Meg too! Loving these M&S cake ideas – I’m currently planning on making my own cake, but it would be lovely not to have that stress! x

While the seedheads are drying you can start work on the stamens. These tend to come in bunches of around 100. Divide these into smaller groups of about ten. Take one group, make sure the heads are roughly level, and brush the middle and up to a centimetre from each end with edible glues Squeeze the stamen threads together to bind them, and let dry. Do this with each small group.
We are having a very DIY wedding, in a beautiful barn, and our theme is ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’. So our cake will feature lots of beautiful flowers, perhaps with a touch of hessian and lace. I’ve been debating making my own cake toppers from fimo and I’d like to include our Chocolate Lab Meg too! Loving these M&S cake ideas – I’m currently planning on making my own cake, but it would be lovely not to have that stress! x
While I'd love to go into  the many options of cake decorating, right now I don't have the time, so just a brief mention of royal icing. This is made using icing sugar and egg whites, or from a pre bought mix, and is a pipeable icing that dries very hard. It can be coloured before piping, or painted after, and is great for adding detail such as beads and borders to cake. While I used none on the poppy cake, a sprinkling of piped pearls or a bead border around the top edge can be great for covering up flaws and cracks in the icing, while enhancing the overall look of the cake.
When making wedding celebration strategies, Time is such an essential element. Naturally, you would certainly not want your wedding event be hurriedly done or hurried. It is vital to dedicate a proper time in getting wedding celebration cakes due to the fact that the wedding event cake is a part of the wedding event plan.
Traditionally the bride would place a ring inside the couple's portion of the cake to symbolise acceptance of the proposal.[9] Bride's pie would evolve into the bride's cake. At this point the dessert was no longer in the form of a pie and was sweeter than its predecessor.[10] The bride cake was traditionally a plum or fruit cake. In mid-18th century, double icing, which means covering the cake first with almond icing and then with the kind of white icing, was used in bride cake.[11] White-iced upper surface of the bride cake was used as a platform on which all sorts of scenes and emblems could be mounted. The decoration was appeared, they were often at least partially three-dimensional, were colourful. However, since some decoration were made in a variety of substances, sometimes the decoration or even parts of wedding cake were inedible.[11] In The myth that eating the pie would bring good luck was still common but the glass ring slowly died out and the flower bouquet toss replaced it.

The cake in this instructable is a two tier fruit cake, decorated with gorgeous bright red poppies. This is a design specific to my friends' desires, but I have attempted to expand the instructable to cover making wedding cakes in general, from the ambitious planning stages to the nervewracking final set up. This may have led me to ramble a little more than I should, but buried amongst that are the little tips &  tricks I've picked up a long the way.
Another way to save money on your cake is to skip an outer layer of frosting. Naked cakes are not only gorgeous to look at, they're actually pretty practical too. They're a lot less expensive because they use less buttercream and take less time—it's as simple as that. To make up for the lack of frosting on the outside, up the wow factor on the inside by experimenting with unique flavors and fillings, like lemon curd, champagne buttercream or chocolate ganache with toasted almonds.
Sugar flowers are beautiful things. With care and patience they can be delicate fascimiles of real blooms, created using an edible medium which will last for months if kept dry and cool. As well as cakes they can make good display pieces, a sort of floral sculpture. The flowers are made from flowerpaste (gumpaste) , a very elastic sugarpaste that can be rolled and mainpulated into realistic petals that dry hard and brittle.
Take a 30 gauge wire, dip it in edible glue, and carefully insert this into the raised ridge. Gently pinch the edges of the petal to give them a little realistic frill. If you have a petal veiner, lay the petal in the venier and press down firmly. This will give the petal veins and contours to make it more realistic, This can also be acheived with some patience and a thin modellling tool.
Royal icing is made with sugar and egg white or meringue powder. It hardens to a firm finish that can be piped or thinned for "flood work". It hardens fast and is ideal for making detailed shapes ahead of time. It can also be piped directly onto cake tiers and works beautifully for delicate work.[1] a few things to consider when working with royal icing: You must use grease free utensils. Humidity also affects the consistency of royal icing. a well known British cake decorator uses royal icing as a medium, Joseph Lambeth developed a style by creating layered scrolls with Royal Icing.
Create a step-by-step, day-by-day schedule for the wedding week. Plan which day or days you will bake, make the filling and frosting, and assemble. The more planning and shopping you do in advance, the less likely you are to run into big problems the week of the wedding. Think through what you need to bring if you're traveling to the city where the cake will be baked, where you are baking the cake, and whether there's space in the fridge and/or freezer for storing cake layers and tiers before they're assembled. If you're using fresh flowers, plan for them to be delivered or decide where you're going to purchase them.
Once cooked, leave the cake to cool in the tin. When cool, remove from the tin and place on some baking parchment. Drizzle a couple of tablespoons of brandy (or your other chosen liquor) over the cake and wrap it up tightly in parchment and clingfilm or foil. Every few days unwrap the cake to feed it with another spoonful of liquor, then wrap it back up and return to a safe, temperate storage space.
Wedding cake was originally a luxury item, and a sign of celebration and social status. The bigger the cake, the higher the social standing. Wedding cakes in England and early America were traditionally fruit cakes, often topped with marzipan and icing with tiers, Cutting the cake was an important part of the reception. White icing was also a symbol of money and social importance in Victorian times, so a white cake was highly desired.[5] Today, many flavors and configurations are available in addition to the traditional all-white tiered cake.[6]
Once the marzipan is draped over the cake, gently pull down the sides to cover any gaps. Smooth the flat of your hand down the sides, pressing the marzipan to the cake and amoothing out any creases or overlaps, Rub the flat of your hand or a cake smoother over the top firmly to flatten and smooth the surface. Smooth out the sides in the same way. Trim off any excess marzipan around the bottom of the cake with a sharp knife and peel it off the board. This can be kept in an airtight bag or container for use next time.
We’re still in the middle of planning everything and being very DIY-EY with it all. As a brownie leader I love crafting things from our invitations to our table centres and thr next big thing on my list-the cake! I love the idea of having a blank canvas cake to decorate ourselves! Our theme is rustic and natural/spring garden but with having a fiancee in the military we’ve have picked navy as our main colour to run through the day. If I was lucky enough to win, my ideal cake would be 4 tiers with some hessian wrapped around each tier, but every girl loves a bit of jewel and sparkle; so my idea would be to have some thin navy ribbon over lapping the hessian and then some pearls or sequins threaded into this! {Lots of hand threading to do!} The cake would be topped with an old fashioned style plane – like the ones used in ww2 and some bunting attached to the end of this plane saying ‘True Love.’
A wedding cake is the traditional cake served at wedding receptions following dinner. In some parts of England, the wedding cake is served at a wedding breakfast; the 'wedding breakfast' does not mean the meal will be held in the morning, but at a time following the ceremony on the same day. In modern Western culture, the cake is usually on display and served to guests at the reception. Traditionally, wedding cakes were made to bring good luck to all guests and the couple. Modernly however, they are more of a centerpiece to the wedding and are not always even served to the guests. Some cakes are built with only a single edible tier for the bride and groom to share, but this is rare since the cost difference between fake and real tiers is minimal.
There's nothing quite as special as a showstopping wedding cake—but we get it, every budget has its limits. And if the price per slice of wedding cake is giving you budget anxiety, don't feel like you need to nix the idea altogether. Instead, speak openly with your cake baker, tap into your creativity and use these straightforward tips so you don't have sacrifice this sweet detail.
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