Unless you’re a keen baker, the wealth of different icing choices available to you may well have been a mystery until now. Naked, semi-naked and buttercream cakes are all increasing in popularity by the day, but there’s still a place for the more traditional fondant and royal icing decorations on cakes. You might even want to combine several. Think fondant sugar flowers atop a buttercream cake or delicate royal icing piping to add detail to a fondant covering. More flavour choices are possible with buttercream, but it is also more likely to melt in the warmer summer temperatures, so be sure to take this into account.

A wedding cake is the traditional cake served at wedding receptions following dinner. In some parts of England, the wedding cake is served at a wedding breakfast; the 'wedding breakfast' does not mean the meal will be held in the morning, but at a time following the ceremony on the same day. In modern Western culture, the cake is usually on display and served to guests at the reception. Traditionally, wedding cakes were made to bring good luck to all guests and the couple. Modernly however, they are more of a centerpiece to the wedding and are not always even served to the guests. Some cakes are built with only a single edible tier for the bride and groom to share, but this is rare since the cost difference between fake and real tiers is minimal.
Flower paste or gumpaste is a pliable dough usually made from egg whites, unflavored gelatine, and powdered sugar. There are an array of methods and ingredients around the world on how to make flower paste or gumpaste. The purpose of this dough is to create flowers and decorations for a cake. Due to the use of gum as one of the ingredients; it can be rolled very thin.[citation needed]
In some areas, particularly the American South, two cakes are presented at weddings. Usually, a large, white tiered cake, decorated mostly in white frosting, is called the bride's cake, and a second flavor choice is called the "groom's cake". This tradition was brought over from England by early American colonists,[citation needed] who considered the white-iced bride's cake too light for men's tastes. The groom's cake was usually a dark, liquor-soaked fruitcake. More recently, groom's cakes are usually chocolate or another of his favorite flavors. The groom's cake may be decorated or shaped as something significant to him, such as a hobby item, sports team or symbol of his occupation. The movie Steel Magnolias included a red velvet groom's cake in the shape of a giant armadillo.

The cake in this instructable is a two tier fruit cake, decorated with gorgeous bright red poppies. This is a design specific to my friends' desires, but I have attempted to expand the instructable to cover making wedding cakes in general, from the ambitious planning stages to the nervewracking final set up. This may have led me to ramble a little more than I should, but buried amongst that are the little tips &  tricks I've picked up a long the way.

In the United States, white vanilla wedding cake(s) with white vanilla frosting(s) are currently the most popular wedding cakes, but different flavors of cakes and fillings can be added between the layers. Wedding cake flavors include chocolate, vanilla, strawberry, mocha, cappuccino, and even red velvet. Many modern cakes now consist of flavors such as vanilla sponge, chocolate sponge or carrot cake.
Will a faux cake or a faux tier save you money on your wedding cake?  I’m sorry to say, but the answer is no.  It seems like having a chunk of Styrofoam vs. a piece of delicious cake should cost less.  I know logically, it sounds like it should.  So in an effort to dispel that myth, I will explain why it’s not the case.  A faux tier, or cake dummy, as we call them, costs about the same it does to bake the actual cake.  So, no cost savings there.  Second, I personally find cake dummies more difficult to work with then real cake, so I’m my opinion, it actually takes longer to decorate them then it does real cake.  So the time that it typically takes to decorate can actually be longer, which means, you guessed it, no cost savings there either!
Traditionally the bride would place a ring inside the couple's portion of the cake to symbolise acceptance of the proposal.[9] Bride's pie would evolve into the bride's cake. At this point the dessert was no longer in the form of a pie and was sweeter than its predecessor.[10] The bride cake was traditionally a plum or fruit cake. In mid-18th century, double icing, which means covering the cake first with almond icing and then with the kind of white icing, was used in bride cake.[11] White-iced upper surface of the bride cake was used as a platform on which all sorts of scenes and emblems could be mounted. The decoration was appeared, they were often at least partially three-dimensional, were colourful. However, since some decoration were made in a variety of substances, sometimes the decoration or even parts of wedding cake were inedible.[11] In The myth that eating the pie would bring good luck was still common but the glass ring slowly died out and the flower bouquet toss replaced it.
The bride's cake would transform into the modern wedding cake we know today.[3] In the early 19th century, sugar became easier to obtain during the time when the bride's cakes became popular. The more refined and whiter sugars were still very expensive. so only wealthy families could afford to have a very pure white frosting. This display would show the wealth and social status of the family.[12] When Queen Victoria used white icing on her cake it gained a new title, royal icing.[13]
Tone down what costs the most – In the wedding cake industry, think about what costs the most money. First and foremost it time. Do not have any extra flowers or decorative features on the cake. Keep it simple but just having a colored ribbon around the cake. Next, do not have any fillings and fillings are extra time and cost for the filling. Last, only plan a cake size for the exact number of planned attending guests and one piece for each.

You’ll need a cake that is appropriate with the look of your venue, the season, your marriage ceremony robe, the flower arrangements and the menu. Arrive at your cake session prepared—you need not have a whole sketch in hand, however data of basic phrases will make it easier on everybody. And if you happen to’re searching for a customized design, bring alongside inspiration, like a swatch of lace from your gown or a picture of your marriage ceremony china.
Traditionally the bride would place a ring inside the couple's portion of the cake to symbolise acceptance of the proposal.[9] Bride's pie would evolve into the bride's cake. At this point the dessert was no longer in the form of a pie and was sweeter than its predecessor.[10] The bride cake was traditionally a plum or fruit cake. In mid-18th century, double icing, which means covering the cake first with almond icing and then with the kind of white icing, was used in bride cake.[11] White-iced upper surface of the bride cake was used as a platform on which all sorts of scenes and emblems could be mounted. The decoration was appeared, they were often at least partially three-dimensional, were colourful. However, since some decoration were made in a variety of substances, sometimes the decoration or even parts of wedding cake were inedible.[11] In The myth that eating the pie would bring good luck was still common but the glass ring slowly died out and the flower bouquet toss replaced it.
Brilliant, some really fantastic ideas. We have been thinking about getting the cheese tiered cake from M&S and decorating it ourselves but I now really love the idea of getting these cakes and decorating it. We’ve got two little birds to sit on top of our cake (whatever cake we eventually choose) that are actually ring holders! They’d look lovely on top of this M&S cake with some flowers and lace. Thank you, I feel inspired!
We’re still in the middle of planning everything and being very DIY-EY with it all. As a brownie leader I love crafting things from our invitations to our table centres and thr next big thing on my list-the cake! I love the idea of having a blank canvas cake to decorate ourselves! Our theme is rustic and natural/spring garden but with having a fiancee in the military we’ve have picked navy as our main colour to run through the day. If I was lucky enough to win, my ideal cake would be 4 tiers with some hessian wrapped around each tier, but every girl loves a bit of jewel and sparkle; so my idea would be to have some thin navy ribbon over lapping the hessian and then some pearls or sequins threaded into this! {Lots of hand threading to do!} The cake would be topped with an old fashioned style plane – like the ones used in ww2 and some bunting attached to the end of this plane saying ‘True Love.’
Wedding cake was originally a luxury item, and a sign of celebration and social status. The bigger the cake, the higher the social standing. Wedding cakes in England and early America were traditionally fruit cakes, often topped with marzipan and icing with tiers, Cutting the cake was an important part of the reception. White icing was also a symbol of money and social importance in Victorian times, so a white cake was highly desired.[5] Today, many flavors and configurations are available in addition to the traditional all-white tiered cake.[6]
There's nothing quite as special as a showstopping wedding cake—but we get it, every budget has its limits. And if the price per slice of wedding cake is giving you budget anxiety, don't feel like you need to nix the idea altogether. Instead, speak openly with your cake baker, tap into your creativity and use these straightforward tips so you don't have sacrifice this sweet detail.
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